A Chapter 13 bankruptcy is designed for individuals with regular income who desire to pay their debts but are currently unable to do so. The purpose of Chapter 13 bankruptcy is to enable individual debtors to propose and perform a repayment plan under which creditors are paid over an extended period of time. Under this chapter, debtors are permitted to repay creditors, in full or in part, in installments over a three-year to five-year period. Under a Chapter 13 bankruptcy plan you will not lose your property. Any individual, even if self-employed or operating an unincorporated business, is eligible for Chapter 13 bankruptcy relief as long as the individual's unsecured debts are less than $336,900 and secured debts are less than $1,010,650. An individual cannot file Chapter 13 bankruptcy or any other chapter if, during the preceding 180 days, a prior bankruptcy petition was dismissed due to the debtor's willful failure to appear before the court or comply with orders of the court or was voluntarily dismissed after creditors sought relief from the bankruptcy court to recover property upon which he or she holds liens. Chapter 13 affords the debtor a right to cure defaults on long-term home mortgage debts by bringing the payments current over a reasonable period of time. The debtor is permitted to cure a default with respect to a lien on the debtor's principal residence up until the completion of a foreclosure sale under state law. Another benefit of Chapter 13 is that you can "cram down" the repayment of debts for secured property other than mortgages to the current market value. For example, if you owe $20,000 on a car that is worth only $15,000, you would only have to repay $15,000. However, the cram down provision does not apply to long-term debts that cannot be paid off during the life of the plan and only applies to debts that are at least 910 days (2½ years) old. The Repayment Plan The proposed Chapter 13 plan usually must commit all projected "disposable income" to repayment of the debts. Disposable income is defined as income not reasonably necessary for the maintenance or support of the debtor or dependents. Within 30 days after the filing of the plan, the debtor must start making payments to the trustee even if the plan has not yet been approved by the court. If the plan is confirmed by the bankruptcy judge, the chapter 13 bankruptcy trustee begins the distribution of the funds received in accordance with the plan. Once the court confirms the plan, it is the responsibility of the debtor to make the plan succeed. The debtor must make regular payments to the trustee or the bankruptcy may be dismissed. A repayment plan must be at least 36 months, and no longer than 60 months, depending on the debtor's income. Chapter 13 Bankruptcy Discharge Upon completion of the plan, you are entitled to a discharge of any remaining balances owed on any dischargeable accounts provided for in the plan. Of course, secured debts will not be discharged until they are paid in full if you wish to keep the secured property. A debtor may not receive a discharge in a Chapter 13 case if they received a discharge in a case filed under Chapter 7 or 13 during the two-year period preceding the date of the order for relief in the Chapter 13 case.In order to file your bankruptcy, our office needs complete information about your debts including the creditors name and address, the approximate date the account was opened, the approximate amount owed, the account number, any co-debtors (anyone other than yourself, or yourself and spouse if filing jointly), and other information concerning your assets and liabilities. We also must have your most recent pay stubs for the past six months, and you must have filed all tax returns. You can download our intake sheet using the button on the left. The Spagnola Law Firm is a federally designated debt-relief agency. We help people file for bankruptcy relief under the Bankruptcy Code.
Chapter 13 Bankruptcy
The Spagnola Law FIrm in Greensboro, North Carolina, represents clients throughout the Piedmont Triad area, also including Gibsonville, High Point, Jamestown, Oak Ridge, Pleasant Garden, Sedalia, Winston-Salem, Asheboro, Liberty, Whitsett, Kernersville, Reidsville, Eden and Randleman in Guilford County, Rockingham County, Randolph County and Alamance County. 

The Spagnola Law Firm

441-B Battleground Avenue Greensboro, NC 27401 336-373-8469 info@triadlaw.com http://triadlaw.com
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THE SPAGNOLA LAW FIRM

Greensboro North Carolina Family Law, Bankruptcy and Estate Attorney
High Quality Legal Representation Since 1998
336-373-8469

THE SPAGNOLA LAW FIRM

Greensboro North Carolina Family Law, Bankruptcy and Estate Attorney
High Quality Legal Representation Since 1998